Day 355: Weekly Prayer: Your Purpose

January 10, 2013

For day 355, I read and prayed through chapter 13 of Omartian’s The Power of a Praying Husband, called “Her Purpose.” When Omartian asked various women what they wanted their husbands to pray for regarding their purpose, they answered that they wanted prayer that they would understand God’s purpose for their life, that they would be able to recognize their gifts and talents, that they would be the wife God wants them to be, that they would be a wife deserving of honor and respect, that they would be the wife their husbands need them to be, that they would use their gifts to help others, and that they would fulfill God’s call on their lives. I prayed for all of these things for you on day 355, and more.

If you don’t recognize your gifts and talents, I do (at least some of the many). You’re very artistic, you are great with our kids, you’re good with people, you can tolerate me, you know how to handle me, and you do a great Irish jig.

In addition, I think you’re just the wife God wants you to be. Though you’re imperfect, you’re growing, and you’re already a tremendous marriage partner.

You deserve honor and respect as well, for trudging with me through years of graduate school, for putting up with me through my slow character growth, for shining as a light with our girls, and for making life fun. I just hope I give you the honor and respect you deserve.

I’ve seen you use your gifts for others. The time and energy that you invest in our children is a prime example. Though you’ve desired to go back to school, you’ve put that aside in order to focus on our children. Since you’re so great with them, the investment has been paying off very well.

Whatever God’s “call” or “purpose” for your life is, you’re honoring him by doing and being all of the above. I pray that you would acknowledge him in all your ways so that he makes your path straight.

 

 

 


Day 349: Weekly Prayer: Your Fears

November 29, 2012

In her chapter on fear, Omartian talked about some things that some women sometimes fear. (These fears aren’t unique to women, but men—or at least I—sometimes fear them too.) A woman might fear physical danger, lack of provision for herself and her family, or what people think of her. I would add to that, that people often fear death (but what is the fear of death? a fear that one will cease to exist or a fear of meeting the divine in judgment or a fear of the process of death or something else?)

I prayed, for my 349th act of love, that God would calm your fears. I prayed that the love of God would drive fear out of your life. At the same time, I prayed that you would fear God—the Creator and sustainer of the universe and your life and the one who will judge the living and the dead at the final resurrection.  Having said that, I’m not sure what an appropriate fear of God—a loving Father but omnipotent creator—looks like.

Anyway, I pray that God would cast out fear from your life. What reason do you have to fear? The God who loves you is also in charge of your safety, your provision, and your life. What he does with those things is for your good. And, what he, not your neighbor, thinks of you is what ultimately matters.


Day 304: Weekly Prayer: Your (Wonderful) Moods

August 18, 2012

I read and prayed through the chapter on the moods of women in Omartian’s The Power of a Praying Husband. How convicting and eye-opening it was!

Often, I don’t take seriously or get frustrated by your changes of mood. Instead, I should be patient with you and marvel at how wonderfully complex you are.

Omartian gave me some good advice for what to do when you get into such a state. She says to (1) pray, (2) ask you what’s going on (but even that needs to be worded carefully), (3) listen carefully, and (4) say one of the following:

a. I love you;

b. You are the greatest woman in the world to me;

c. You’re beautiful when you’re moody;

d. Tell me what’s on your mind, and I promise not to get mad;

e. How have I let you down;

f. Have you been getting enough sleep?

g. What would make you happy right now?

h. I don’t have all the answers, but God does;

i. Do you want to pray about this together?

I actually think I’ll stick with (a), (b), (d), (e), (g), and (i) and repetitions thereof. (c) and (f) seem especially dangerous.

PS: I’ve been dreading even writing this blog post because I’m afraid of offending you or some other woman. I even dreaded writing this post script. So I kept things brief to minimize my chances of saying something wrong.


Day 293: Weekly Prayer

August 3, 2012

For act 293, I prayed through the fourth chapter of The Power of a Praying Husband, which was about praying for one’s wife’s role as a mother.

This is a challenging stage in your life as a mother. I’m gone all day at least five days a week for work and we have three children under 6. That means you’re at home alone all day (nearly) every day with three very young children who (in spite of their virtues) are often whining, scratching, biting, screaming, fighting, running, and tripping. They’re frequently hurting themselves and others, needing food, drink, snuggles, sleep, comfort, and kisses. Basically, they’re dependent on you for almost everything.

Given this, nearly every day when I come home, you’re at your wit’s end and the children are going crazy. So, typically, I keep them company, usually by taking them outside and letting them get some energy out.

I prayed, for my 15 minutes, that you would have the strength and energy you need to care for our children, to meet their needs while I’m at work. I also prayed that God would give you patience and wisdom as you seek to raise them well.


Day 270: Weekly Prayer

July 6, 2012

For Sunday’s act of love (6/24), I read through the first chapter of The Power of a Praying Husband. The focus was on becoming the right kind of husband, one who is (among other things) of one mind with his wife, compassionate, loving, tenderhearted, and courteous.

The first is not something a husband has complete control over. Like the tango, being of one mind takes two. However, I can do my part to help us become of one mind: I can pray for that end, that there would be no division or quarrels in our marriage, but that we would continue to share the same purpose of devoting our lives to glorifying God and making him known.

The latter four struck me hard because I need a lot of work in each of those areas. As an example, here are a couple of questions she asked:

Do you ever talk to your wife in a way that would be considered rude if you were speaking to a friend or business associate? Are you kind to everyone all day at work, but then you take out your frustration, exhaustion, and anger on your wife when you get home?

I answered yes to each of them. Although my behavior toward you isn’t characterized by rudeness and I don’t often take out my frustration etc. on you when I get home from work, I still recognize these tendencies in me. May the God of all peace make me a peacemaker rather than a divider in our marriage.

I pray that there would be peace in our marriage and unity, and that we’d be of the same mind and judgment. May I be tenderhearted toward you and   compassionate, loving, and courteous. May I live with you in an understanding way. Praise God that we worship the same God and desire to live under his authority.